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that they have to try to cut spending to deal with the nation's deficit. we're watching what's going on at the white house, we'll have the full coverage of the news conference leading into it. we're also watching right now what's happening in newtown, connecticut. one month to the stay after that brutal massacre, you're looking now at live pictures, a news conference there, they're going to read a poem, let's listen in. >> it is a sad honor to be here today. it's been one month since i lost my son dillon and 25 other teams lost their loved ones. at times it feels like only yesterday and at other times it feels as if many years have passed. i still find myself reaching for dillon's hand to walk through a car parking lot. it's so hard to believe he's gone. at the same time i look at our community and what has been achieved in one month. a vacant school has been lovingly restored with great care and attention to welcome students back into a peaceful and safe environment. many businesses and groups are promoting the love we have in newtown as well as fundraising to help those in most nee
, came from borrowing, the deficit. the sum total of all of these annual deficits, plus the interest is national debt. today the national debt extends at $16.4 trillion. the treasury is empowered to borrow money to make up for that shortfall. but only up to a certain amount. that's the debt ceiling. keep it in mind, the treasury does not make decisions about how the money is spent. they're simply empowered in this case to borrow money and write the checks to pay the bills incurred by your democratically elected congress. today the debt ceiling is $16.3 trillion which is less than our debt. the treasury can use extraordinary measures to raise an extra $200 billion. those extra funds will only last until about mid february or early march according to the bipartisan policy center. good luck trying to explain this to conservative talk radio show host, rush limbaugh. >> i think it's a debt limit as your monthly credit card limit. you can't go over it on your credit card. and the united states government can't spend more than what its credit limit is or its debt limit. now ali velshi at cn
the numbers for the deficit reduction so far. that is coming up later. up next, is the u.s. entering a new battleground in the war on terror? [ male announcer ] when these come together, and these come together, one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealmaking. you've mastered monkey-style kung fu? no. priceline is different now. you don't even have to bid. master hahn taught you all that? oh, and he says to say (translated from cantonese) "you still owe him five bucks." your accent needs a little work. >> bret: the youngest and most innocent are victims of the syrian war. 13 people were killed including eight chirp. >>> dense smog is causing problems in china. beijing is known,
to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all of them. and i was thinking there have been two major changes. number one is the dataset that is clearly much greater. the deficit is much greater. when i think of the ways and means committee, would change their has been in the composition. the ranking member at a time when i started went to the world bank. i worked with bill on trade. he was handling the tax material mainly. and bill was working on health care at the time. i think a second major change is very much effective today and affects us today. it is this change in composition of the republican party. i think it has moved very much more to the right. i think that makes it very difficult to handle the problems that we have before us. let me comment briefly on where we are. you offer the president yesterday. we have had spending cuts of a trillion and a half dollars. it comes f
night at 8 on c-span's "q&a." >> next, a discussion on the debt ceiling and deficit reduction debate. this was part of a brookings institution forum on jobs and the economy. this panel is an hour or and 20 minutes -- an hour and 20 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> all right. should we get started again? um, i'm either using that vision, or that clock is way off. but i'll use my watch. okay. so if everybody could come in from coffee and sit down, we'll get started on our second panel. and we're delighted to welcome a really terrific set of panelists, lew kaden, vice chair of citi, maya macguineas who is now involved in or leading the fix the debt campaign. bob mcdonald who is the ceo and president of procter & gamble, and ralph schlosstein who's the ceo of ever corp.. so really a terrific group. let me just give a little bit of context, at least while everyone's filing into the room. i'm martin baily with the economic studies program at brookings. if we cast our minds back to the 1960s, the 1960s, obviously b, was a troubled decade politically, but economically growth was pretty
they have to really assert a move toward deficit reduction? >> you know, in my mind they actually missed the best chance they had, which was the expiration of the bush tax cuts, which was really the best chance for both sides. if there was ever a point where a grand bargain was possible, it would have been i think the republicans accepting rolling back more of that tax cut than we did in return for acquiring democrats to deal with the very real long-term challenge of entitlements. we did not take advantage of that. we had a minimalist deal that confirms 82% of bush tax cuts, possibly the worst possible outcome and no spending cuts, probably the worst possible outcome in the long term from a deficit perspective. now i think the history is this is not a powerful mechanism. in the end it's a doomsday device you cannot use. you go back to the midninety with bill clinton and the republican congress, look at 2011. i think in the end they will decide they cannot use this measure and they seem to be heading that way this week in their house republican retreat. >> ian bremer is with us. he's the
industry and manufacturing. the second on deficit reform, and the third on improving government performance. the participants here today include brookings scholars, outside experts, and private sector representatives and leaders. our discussions will reflect a lot of the research that goes on here at brookings, and you will be able to find a number of examples of that research outside the auditorium where you came in. my recommended particular, the work of our metropolitan program on ideas on how to revitalize manufacturing, and also the work of art government studies program on how to make innovation-based economy. the growth through innovation project is an example of what we're doing increasingly here at brookings, and that is undertaking both research and public events and outreach that draw from multiple programs of research pro-guns here at the institution. and we have three of our research programs represented here today. the growth through innovation project is led inside a brookings by darrell west of our government studies program, bruce katz, of our metropolitan program of our ec
. our current obsession with slashing the deficit and avoiding that well-known and worn fiscal cliff is killing us, krugman writes, getting in the way of what really needs to be done, which is dedicating government to creating jobs and getting us back to full employment. he blames not only congress but the white house. paul krugman is professor of economics and international affairs at princeton university. since 1999, he's been an op-ed columnist at "the new york times" and now also writes a blog for the paper titled "the conscience of a liberal." according to the search engine technorati, it's the most popular blog by an individual on the internet. author or editor of some 20 books and more than 200 professional papers, krugman is a thinker so esteemed and widely known in his field he's become an icon. not only has he won the nobel prize in economics, he's also the subject of this song by the balladeer loudon wainwright iii -- ♪ i read the new york times that's where i get my news ♪ ♪ paul krugman's on the op-ed page that's where i get ♪ ♪ the blues 'cause paul always tel
capacity coming out of the crisis. it is a credit deficit in the community and some regional bank that again is a serious public policy to address the next couple of years. >> thank you. my, what teacher perspective on the short run and long-run, so let's start on the short run because we are right in the middle. we sort of avoided the fiscal cliff. sad events involving over the next couple and how are these going to play out? >> if anyone you think should be played out, i'd be thrilled to know the answer because it's one of the more confusing moments. then they start by saying it's moment which do think there's an awful lot of good news in that news. the conference is focusing on the overall economic picture in the pieces that go into feeling economic growth and innovation. there's so much goodness to be had, so many ideas in a think tank where so many developed about luck and hope that growth in our country cynic at decision to use those that have a positive outcome. if one, the whole fiscal issue as i could coming up the wheels of everything else. right now there's basically no
of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back and forth over these three issues. i think i just want, without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is that not everybody understand what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling, raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating sank i know how we can save money, we won't pay off credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was the very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august 2011 i got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very, very important that all these issues are important but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much
the narrow lens of deficit reduction so the larger goal of economic growth and maintaining the health and economic security of all americans. now, there's no question that reducing the federal deficit is a worthwhile goal. nobody's going to argue with that. we need to address our nation's long term physical problem. we understand that. they affect all of us. most importantly our children and our grandchildren. their future would not be bright if they are drowning in red ink of budget deficits and soaring national debt. we understand that too. however, their futures will not be very bright if they can't afford health care or if they can't afford a quality education or if they don't have the opportunity to attain long term financial security. leaving them with less economic security by weakening social security and medicare would be just as bad, and for many people, it would be worse, and if we weaken social security and medicare to the point of their parents and grandparents to no longer live with dignity and purpose, we will be risking their futures as well. as a nation, we have to br
if it is called, then it has to face the economic tasked with value facing 20% and a huge fiscal deficit thanks to the patronage of the last year than you are going to start to see a lot of the chickens come home to roost and see it break apart. this is very similar after -- basically he was forced to engage in a austerity package around 1952 until 55 and that is what basically got him kicked out. and then of course after 1944 he died and you begin to see that internal battle, then you begin to see diffraction happening but not until -- >> that is a perfect segue because i want to bring it back to russell for the question. we talked about politics and about constitution, institutions. we talked about the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's
seriously with having a mess about deficit reduction, he knows you cannot begin to to deficit reduction until you take a serious approach to welfare reform. on the side of the house we're doing it in a fair and responsible way. a way that rewards hard work. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole house will wish to join me in paying tribute to richard reginald walker, 28 engine regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. it is clear to see from the tributes paid that he was outstanding soldier and mutual respect. are deep assemblies are are with his family and his friends at this difficult time. mr. speaker, i would also like to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further such meetings later today. >> for
to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone
is if there's no change over the next couple of decades, deficits will rise, debt to gdp ratios will rise and our debt would not be sustainable. very important objective for policy is to find a plan to bring the federal budget under control over the next few decades. the second issue, which in some ways seems contradictory to the first, is that we are still in a relatively fragile recovery and we want to avoid taking fiscal action that will push the economy back into recession. that was one of the risks that the fiscal cliff posed. the challenge is to achieve long run sustainability without unduly hampering the recovery which we have. the deal that was struck together with the previous work in 2011 that involved some spending cuts made some progress in both of these goals. sustainability still abil over the decade we have seen improvement in the debt to gdp ratio. there's more work to be done, but some progress there. and in the short run, the fiscal cliff deal on new year's eliminated a good bit of the restrictive components of the fiscal policy that would have had such adverse effects.
could be here. he is a deficit hawk. more important than that he is a thoughtful and conscious -- voice of a conscious for the senate throughout his term on fiscal responsibility. we worked together in a very effective way to try to bring some sort of bipartisan effort into the requirement that we do something about the debt. it was really, as was mentioned, an idea that we came up with on a long plane ride i think to central america to put together a commission that then threw into the simpson bowls proposal that has become the defining memo for the effort to try to get that is under control. bob zoellick is fond of quoting a friend of his, the foreign minister of australia. we met a few months ago who said to him the united states is one debt deal away from leading the world out of fiscal chaos and disruption. we are. we truly are. we are a nation on the brink of massive economic expansion. from the place that can't is from, north dakota, you see the change in the paradigm on energy. we will go from importing country to an exporting country. our cost of energy for as far as i can see
mean for some crops. >>> and can california's deficit really become a budget surplus? we are going to talk with state senator jerry hill live in studio about what seems to be a budget miracle. >>> we have temperatures mostly in the 20s this morning in the inland valleys. freeze warnings posted but nevertheless we've got sun out there and a beautiful sunrise on the way for your sunday morning. we will have the forecast. first we will take a break. citrus growers in the south save their crops. >>> well, the cold weather plaguing california has citrus growers in the south scrambling to save their crops. >> that's right. and one kern county orchard they couldn't pick the oranges fast enough. one grower harvested only about 1/3 of his oranges before the temperatures plunged. his grove is a small part of call's -- california's $2 billion citrus economic but also an economic reality at work here. if the freeze destroys his crops he won't be able to employ workers. >>> it is freezing for sure. we are even looking at possible record breaking lows? what
and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade. which would stabilize our debt, and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable. so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research, all the things that help us grow. step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue. by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the
, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits, it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family which is trying to improve its credit rating saying, i know how we can save money, we won't pay our credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. >> the metaphors, jim, whether it's a family not paying the credit card bills, the president saying it's like dining and dashing at a restaurant, the only thing is we've got two weeks of respite and then we're off to the races again. >> after the civil war, there was tremendous partisanship in this country. a tumultuous time. the level of bipartisanship. there's such hatred that you can't get in a room. it never seems like obama gets in the room. biden got in the room beforehand. but look, everybody hates each other down there. it's exactly the opposite of what you would expect from a respected nation. it makes us look mickey mouse. i don't blame fitch. look, we have to pay bills, the constitution says it, but everybody doesn't seem
'd never use the debt ceiling to negotiate. there's been three or four deficit deals reached during debt ceiling negotiations. that's what they've been used for in the past. in fact, you voted no on raising the debt ceiling in 2006, and some other things. and then to see him actually, he looked shocked that his loyal cadre of acolytes that someone would actually broach the subject that, you know, that he actually had a tough time answering. >> i think it shows the position he's in, though. he gets attacked from the right and the left. >> he doesn't get attack. the questions i want asked are never asked of him anywhere. >> he should come on "squawk." >> that's not going to happen. >> i'll get out. is that possible? >> no. >> i had a story but we'll talk about that one later. >> what's your story? >> we'll do it later in the broadcast. >> about nerds? >> what else would it be about? you want me to talk to here? i'm going to talk to here. coming up this morning's top stories, plus we're going to hop behind the wheel with nissan ceo carlos ghosn at the detroit auto show. first check this out
. on the newshour tonight, we'll examine what the president said about tackling the government deficit and reducing gun violence. >> brown: then, we turn to the west african nation of mali, where french troops have launched air strikes on islamic militants. three jihaddist groups now deemed a clear and present danger to the capital and beyond, a threat to africa and europe. >> woodruff: margaret warner has the story of the suicide of a young internet wizard who was facing federal charges for hacking and distributing online data he thought should be made public. >> brown: ray suarez updates the changes in cuba, where travel restrictions were eased today for citizens hoping to come and go. >> it is still one of the most repressive places in terms of its human rights record but we welcome any liberalization. we hope that will turn out to be one such. >> woodruff: and with rehearsals already under way for next week's inaugural ceremonies, we examine the new rules for raising money for the festivities. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provi
a complex environment. you don't speak the language and you have cultural deficits. it is almost impossible to develop the contextual understanding that you need. you have to understand if you're trying to impact a society. >> in other news, the militants said they have executed a french hostage captured in 2009. french armed forces tried to rescue him last saturday but failed. they executed him on wednesday evening and they say he was probably killed during the rescue attempt. the country now has a steady government. the united states recognizes them for the first time in 20 years pillar in -- 20 years. lance armstrong has been stripped of his mettle. the committee acted after the governing body found him guilty of systematic doping and stripped them of seven wins. there is speculation as to whether he will lead men to open or apologize. extremists are gaining ground militarily and they're also winning popular support. it has become increasingly powerful. the free syrian army is living in kidnapping. they met one of the leaders of the front and found this exclusive report. >> they are wait
in an administration, did any of the deficit deals that we did, were those occurring at the same time as debt ceiling raises? >> they all do. >> we've heard that that -- i'm not going to accept that, not going to do it, not the way it's done. we're not a banana republic. how many can you recall, deficit deals were affected? it's something that's done, is it not? >> standard operating procedure. we all learned about the power of the purse of democracy. back then, it used to be taxes because they couldn't borrow. now, you can borrow. taxes aren't the only strains what government can spend. the parliament and congress has to be able to control the borrowing level. that's government 101. >> is zit in g-- dis in geingeny we've already been to the restaurant and trying to stiff the bill? it wasn't the $800 stimulus or any of the things the president's done, it's congress? >> first, you're raising debt limits to cover future spending. fact one is the money hasn't been spent yet. that's not true. >> it's sort of disassembling. >> that's a good word for it. the second fact is congress hasn't approved the mone
in that regard, and they haven't experience environmental problems. and with new york's budget deficit, it seems obvious that hydrofracking is the way to go. and, of course, governor cuomo is free to set whatever regulations he wants about that to ensure the safety of quality and other things that residents are concerned about. i would say that the project should proceed. it's brought benefit to other states. there's no reason that new york should be left behind. >> okay. right in front. wait for the mic a fun. >> you get very good examples of unsuccessful creations of new green jobs. had also looked at elimination of existing jobs like really good cost-benefit analysis done for regulations? >> the cost-benefit analysis for mercury was a travesty. if you look at the cost-benefit analysis carefully, all the benefits from reducing mercury came from getting rid of particulates and particulates were not the focus of that particular regulation. and what was interesting is the benefits focus on additional days of school. in other words, a few days of schools miss, two days of work missed because of lo
and deficit reduction plan. the debt ceiling and all around it doesn't really solve the problem. it is a waste of time. adam: let me interrupt you because we have had this debt ceiling essentially part of our discussion for almost 100 years, going back to 1917 with the issue of liberty bonds. now today we talk about the debt ceiling and we talk about its impact, this debate for the people who are watching, and, getting to this craziness we see the market reacting in a way you can't anticipate. what would happen to our 401(k) if congress he said they have to get together, i was thinking two words, "good luck." whether they can't do something? >> if they don't raise the debt ceiling and let's say we get debt downgrades, the market has a fit basically and drops as they did in 2011, all our investments will get hit. the stock market will go down as it did in a big way in the summer of 2011. on the other hand, if they extend the limits, the debt ceiling limit and do something more, maybe not a grand compromise, something more in terms of deficit reduction, my guess is the market will kind of shrug
that with the government facing another trillion dollar deficit this year, any increase in borrowing authority must be tied to cuts in spending. the president flatly disagreed. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. >> brown: the 2011 stand-off between the president and republicans over the debt ceiling led the nation to the bryning of national default. standard and poors even lowered its rating on u.s. government bonds. today, president obama said any repeat performance would be, quote, irresponsible. >> if the goal is to make sure that we are being responsible about our debt and our deficit, if that's the conversation we're having, i'm happy to have that conversation. what i will not do is to have that negotiation with a gun at the head of the american people. >> brown: at the same time, the president rejected urgings by some de
the budget deficit but not in exchange for increasing the debt ceiling. the u.s. government has reached a borrowing limit set by law but republicans continue to reject an increase without spending cuts in social security and other programs. now it's not the first time the u.s. has faced such a stand off. in the summer of 2011 the government and coness mained at odds over raising the limit until the last minute. the incident weighed down on share prices. it also prompted the first downgrade on u.s. government bonds. global car makers are showcasing their latest model at the 2013 international auto show in detroit. more than 50 new models are on display. the u.s. automarket has been recovering with sales rising more than 13% from the previous year. japanese automakers are focusing on fuel efficient compact cars that are gaining popularity. toyota is introducing a new streamline model in an effort to attract young u.s. car makers including ford and general motors are showcasing small cars as well as small vehicles like pickup truck. pickup truck have been avoided by consumer until now but
the primary balance by reducing the deficit to half by fiscal 2015. but the draft fell short of setting a specific limit on the issuance of japanese government bonds to finance the budget, as the previous administration of the democratic party did. it only urges the government to keep bond issues to a minimum. >>> executives at struggling chipmaker renesas electronics say they need to slash their workforce even further. they're planning a 10% staff cut through a voluntary retirement program. renesas is one of the world's largest suppliers of microcontroller chips. managers told the company's labor union that they'll offer early retirement to about 3,000 employees aged 40 and older. the plan is part of restructuring efforts put in place after the company reached a deal on a rescue package with investors. the deal will allow renesas to receive about $2.3 billion from a state-backed fund and several business partners. the chipmaker cut 7,400 jobs through an early retirement program in october. >>> japan's nissan motor will slash domestic prices on its electric cars. that's to boost sluggis
controversial issues -- immigration, gun control, spending, dealing with the national debt and deficit. these are things he sees absolutely no common ground with republicans on. he has to get them to agree, so how is he going to do it? he's defined by his ability to campaign. he's putting that the organization into eight groups that will lobby on his behalf. his inauguration was about changing the town in washington. even people in the white house said that the president has failed to change the town. if anything, it's uglier, angrier, and even more bitter. he was to try to get just enough of the republican party on board with him to pass some of the agenda items and we believe he's going to take them all on at once. >> talk us through what we can expect on monday. >> a bit of a prayer service, but of a poetry reading, and a bit of a political pep rally all rolled into one. the president will give his speech, probably 20 minutes and take the oath of office again -- the fourth time if you think about it because the chief justice made that mistake four years ago. then there is going to b
the deficit to half by the fiscal year of 2015, but the draft did fall short of setting a specific limit on the issuance of government bonds to finance the budget as the previous administration turned democratic party did. it only urges the government to keep bond issues to a minimum. >>> well, executives at struggling chipmaker electronic says they need to slash the workforce further. they are planning a 10% staff cut through a voluntary retirement program. renesas is one of the largest suppliers of microcontroller chips. the managers told the company's labor union they will offer early retirement to about 3,000 employees aged 40 and older. the plan is part of restructuring efforts put in place after the company reached a deal on a rescue package with investors. the deal will allow renesas to receive $2.3 billion from the state-backed fund as well as several business partners. the chipmaker cut early retire, that was back in october. >>> japan's nissan motor will slash domestic prices on its electric cars and that's in an effort to boost sluggish sales of the eco-friendly vehicles. nis
for the taxpayers' use or the expression goes, to reduce the federal deficit. >> thank you, gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> mr. hastings. >> i don't have any questions. >> thank you very much. without a doubt of funds, which i'm working on, -- [inaudible] [laughter] >> thank you, mr. chairman. i ask that the gentleman, i know he's speaking on behalf of the constituents when we bring the amendment to the bill, the size of the package with the addition of your amendment, becomes larger than many entire appropriations bills. $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill. mr. king, that's larger than the financial services appropriation bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill. these are bills from which this congress deliberates for months. hearing the chairman say before you came up to testify that he was committed to making sure that your folks get those things that they need. hearing the priorities that everyone has laid out, knowing these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are need
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed. nevertheless, we still have fairly restrictive fiscal policies now. it is estimated that fed
began the fiscal year with $876.05 in the bank and a projected deficit of $500 million, even after taxes had been increased. i think a number of you remember that as well. working with the legislature, we ended last fiscal year with a $500 million ending balance, a billion dollar swing to the good and we paid off all of our callable bonds. good job, legislature. [applause] we are now in a strong fiscal position. the last decade was unfortunately a lost decade where kansas lost thousands of private sector jobs while the rest of america grew. in december 2010, our unemployment rate was 7%. today our state's unemployment rate is 5.4%, the 10th lowest in america, and wichita state university projects we will add more than 24,000 private sector jobs in the state this year alone. that's good news. [applause] when i started as governor, we had the highest state income tax in the region, now we have the 2nd lowest and i want us to take it to zero. look out texas, here comes kansas. [applause] in the previous decade, we had population losses of more than ten% in nearly half of our counties. today
in deficit reduction in two years. it doesn't get us all of the way there but largely, two thirds of the way there at least within a ten-year budget window. >> russ, what do you think? of course we are approaching this with caution. we know that there's going to be more back and forth. but in the middle of it all, we've got earnings season. and you know, already some people are saying that this anticipation of all of these cliffs, cliff after cliff, has already impacted the earnings period. what are you looking at, what are you seeing from the fourth quarter reporting season so far? it's been a big week obviously this week for financials. >> we're seeing decent performance. again, i think compliments to corporate america because they been able to grind out strong earnings growth with a relatively weak recovery. and margins remain much higher than people thought and this has helped. we are seeing recovery in the rest of the world, and that has helped. it's going to be a decent year. i don't think the problem is the trajectory of the economy. i think the question is how much will these issues
budget deficit and debt, the committee sees that the budget deficit will continue to decline over the next two years. but we do not characterize the debt and deficit at unsustainably high levels. we do think the deficit is reduced to $925 billion in 2013 and narrowed further, to $728 billion in 2014. that is down from $1.1 trillion last year. that gives you an overview of the committee consensus opinion and i would be happy to answer any additional questions you might how about the committee's outlook. i will be happy to entertain other questions as well. yes? >> just to clarify a little bit on the gdp dragon on the tax hike, was that on the payroll and income tax increases? >> that is correct. >> the 1.25% dragon, was out for the whole year? -- the 1.25% drag, was that for the whole year? >> we think it will be for the whole year of fiscal 2013. >> with the labour market and some improvement on as quick as it was, without just -- there was some sentiment that it might be slowing down. >> we are seeing drags on consumer spending, but also from the ongoing recession in europe and j
deficit hawk. the republican senate committee budget guru, and he is offsetting most of the first slice. the bill's actually two pieces, 17 billion and 34 billion. and he's offsetting the 17 billion portion with a across-the-board cut. so it'll be interesting to see if that passes or not. you know, all democrats will vote against it, and i suspect that it will fail. but it'll be interesting to see. for him it's important because they want to establish the principle that emergency spending needs to be offset with spending cuts. which is something that democrats are very afraid of, because they feel like every time there's a disaster, republicans use it as an excuse to go after domestic programs, social services and so forth. so that'll be an important precedent, and then we'll see what happens in the senate. you know, we'll probably see a house/senate conference on the bill or some ping-ponging between the chambers and probably delaying final enactment. >> host: yeah. and the washington times reporting this morning that the conservative group for growth is threatening to punish members w
its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits, it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family trying to improve its credit rating saying, i know how we can save money, we won't pay our credit card bills. not the most effect of way to improve your credit rating. >> ben bernanke says the u.s. economy appears to be willing to raise the debt ceiling. it's downplaying fierce that this could lead to higher inflation. >>. >> what do you think? >> well, i think, you know, what we've seen in the beginning of the year, like the solution of the fiscal cliff for the fist time in the more global renegotiation, what bernanke know and the government is they don't want the economy to be in another recession. probably it's going to be a slow process, but the final aim is there and everybody knows where we need to go. >> all right. let's remind you what's on today's show. we take a look out at the auto show. 5:30 eastern. spain is set to tap the bond market today. it's going to tell 12 and 18-month t bills. analysis is due in about 30 minutes' time. >>>
-interest of the government of venezuela, if you've got a deficit, you know, stop giving oil away. stop subsidizing sales to people. that would be a lodge cl thing -- logical thing to do. and if you had a government that was not as idealogically motivated as the current government, if you had a chavista government not as idealogically motivated as the current government, that would be a real, logical thing for them to do. >> yeah. thank you for those comments. before i go to chris for the last question this round, i want to mention that after that we'll be going to the audience for some of your questions. we'll have circumstance rating microphones, so you can be thinking about the questions. hopefully, the certification to this point has been sufficiently provocative that you'll have a number of questions, and we can go into the procedure for doing that. but just to give you a heads up that that's coming shortly. chris, back to you for really a continuation of where charles left his comments. but i want to press it just a little bit further. you've talked about the democracy side. charles also mentioned
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